DNA India: Vintage is the New Gold

I am one half of a two member editorial and content development studio called The Short Staff. As a full-time freelance writer and editor, I contribute to a bunch of print and digital publications including DNA India’s DNA Money supplement. Here’s a article that was published on May 5, 2017. Here’s an excerpt and the link to the full article

As fate of the Kohinoor continues to be a giant question mark, this April, the Directorate of Revenue Intelligence (DRI) announced the homecoming of over a hundred antique pieces stolen and smuggled out of the country. As the interest in Indian antiques surges, auction houses, dealers and stores dealing with antiquities, vintage items and collectables are garnering new-found interest.

 

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Image courtesy Pexels

International auction house Saffronart’s CEO Hugo Weihe points out, “It’s one area that has seen enormous growth in the past few years. But it’s quite undervalued, in more senses than one. India has an extraordinary heritage of 5,000 years or more and it has really been overlooked.” Saffronart holds live and online auctions of modern, contemporary and classical Indian art as well as offers services like art advisory, appraisals and valuations, and specialised art storage. Viewed on web and smartphones, their online auctions have seen sizeable activities and also exposes a larger, newer audience to the art of collecting rarities. Adapting to this democratic new medium makes auctions hugely accessible.

To read the full article, click here.


 

DNA India: How to Travel like a Millennial by Aditi Gaitonde

I am one half of a two member editorial and content development studio called The Short Staff. As a full-time freelance writer and editor, I contribute to a bunch of print and digital publications including DNA India’s DNA Money supplement. Here’s my piece that was published on Mar 3, 2017. Here’s an excerpt and link to the full article.

It’s safe to say that millennials have a perpetual case of wanderlust. The young Indian traveller has evolved from cookie-cutter tours crammed with “touristy” sight seeing. They want more from their holidays than just Instagram-worthy pictures and Facebook check-ins. They want experiences over luxuries, purpose over presentation and stories over stringent itineraries. They want to put to work, leave a mark, get inspired and take away skills and stories.

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Image courtesy The Remote Life

Online travel company Make My Trip’s India Travel Report 2016 revealed that young Indians are the driving force behind the changing travel landscape, and about 66% of the total trips on the website were made by travellers in the age group 18-35 years. Travel entrepreneurs across the country echo the insight but reveal an underlying trend that promises to turn into a movement.

To read the full article, click here.